01 Mar 2016

March 2016 E-News

  1. CLS AUM (May 2 & 3) registration, exhibitor, sponsor, and poster session information 
  2. Nominations open for Allen Pratt, User Support, and Young Investigator Awards
  3. 6th Annual CLS Mx Data Collection School: May 24–28
  4. Canadian physicists discover new properties of superconductivity 
  5. Gut reaction: understanding ulcers and stomach cancer, and how to stop them 
  6. Robert J. Sawyer novel set at CLS
  7. Travel support for graduate and post-doctoral students 
  8. PhD candidate success at poster competition 
  9. New staff and now hiring

1. CLS AUM (May 2 & 3) registration, exhibitor, sponsor, and poster session information

The 2016 CLS 19th Annual Users' Meeting and associated workshops will take place in Saskatoon May 2 & 3.

Registration is now open and early bird prices will be in effect until April 1. Registration closes April 20. Visit the registration page of the website for more details. 

Interested vendors, exhibitors and sponsors are welcome to contact the Users' Office for more details on how to participate. 

Poster prizes of $300 will be awarded in the areas of materials science, geological/environmental sciences, biological/life sciences, and macromolecular structures. Posters are presented and judged at the AUM and awarded at the banquet dinner. More on the website. 

See you May 2.

2. Nominations open for Allen Pratt, User Support, and Young Investigator Awards   

The Users' Advisory Committee of the CLS is accepting nominations for the Allen Pratt, User Support, and Young Investigator Awards.

The Allen Pratt Award recognizes outstanding service and dedication to the CLS and the Canadian synchrotron community by a current user (or team of users) who has (have) made a significant, recent contribution.

The User Support Award is given to a CLS staff member who has provided outstanding help to visiting researchers.  

The Young Investigator Excellence Award is given to an individual who is an early-career researcher with an excellent publication and/or technical contribution where the CLS has played a substantial role. 

Please nominate a deserving candidate today. Nominations close March 31. More information on the awards page on the website. 

 

 

 

3. 6th Annual CLS Mx Data Collection School: May 24–28  

The Canadian Macromolecular Crystallography Facility is pleased to announce the 6th Annual CLS Mx Data Collection School, being held at the CLS May 24–28, 2016.

This intensive hands-on data collection school equips participants to effectively collect macromolecular crystal diffraction data at the synchrotron and remotely. In addition, this year's invited speaker is Dr. Jeffrey Lee from the University of Toronto, who will guide participants in using the molecular replacement method and in making effective use of COOT.

Given enough interest, an optional introductory crystallography review will be offered May 23. Attendance is limited so early application is encouraged. Application deadline is March 29. Visit the school website for more information and to apply.

 

4. Canadian physicists discover new properties of superconductivity  

An international team of physicists has come one step closer to understanding the mystery of how superconductivity, an exotic state that allows electricity to be conducted with zero resistance, occurs in certain materials.

The new findings, led by Waterloo physicists David Hawthorn and Andrew Achkar, along with CLS scientists Feizhou He and Ronny Sutarto, present direct experimental evidence of what is known as electronic nematicity – when electron clouds snap into an aligned and directional order – in a particular type of high-temperature superconductor. The results, published in the prestigious journal Science, may eventually lead to a theory explaining why superconductivity occurs at higher temperatures in certain materials. 

Read the rest of the CLS science highlight on the website. 

5. Gut reaction: understanding ulcers and stomach cancer, and how to stop them  

Ulcers. They are not only painful and difficult to deal with, but the same bacteria that cause ulcers can lead to stomach cancer and other diseases of the human intestinal tract. But, there is hope.

Scientists from the University of British Columbia, the University of Washington, and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre in Seattle have made an important discovery into understanding and possibly preventing nasty gut bacteria from making us sick.

Read the rest of the story on the website. 

6. Robert J. Sawyer novel set at CLS   

The latest work by science fiction author Robert J. Sawyer is available now. Quantum Night, Sawyer's 23rd novel, is set largely in Saskatoon, in and around our very own Canadian Light Source and features (at least) one of our scientists as a character.

Sawyer worked as a Writer-in-Residence at the CLS in the summer of 2012 where he began working on Quantum Night, as well as helping our staff with their own writing.

Pick up your copy today. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. Travel support for graduate and post-doctoral students  

The CLS graduate and post-doctoral student travel support program has been a huge success this year. We will begin accepting applications again for beamtime occurring after April 1, 2016. And at that time, we will also be introducing new guidelines for the program. More details to come. 

Find out more on our website.

 

 

 

8. PhD candidate success at poster competition

The CLS graduate and post-doctoral student travel support program has been a huge success this year. We will begin accepting applications again for beamtime occurring after April 1, 2016. And at that time, we will also be introducing new guidelines for the program. More details to come. 

Find out more on our website.

 

 

 

9. New staff and now hiring

Welcome to new employees who joined us in February: 

Emilio Heredia joins the BioXAS team as a Science Associate. Emilio most recently worked as a System/Machine Vision Specialist with International Road Dynamics here in Saskatoon. Emilio received his PhD in Space Engineering and Technology from the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and Campinas State University in Brazil.

Cuylar Conly joins the CMCF team for a one year term as Science Associate. He recently worked with the Department of Chemistry at the University of Saskatchewan as a Graduate Research Assistant studying protein crystallography, protein structure analysis and enzymology. Cuylar received his M.Sc in Chemistry from the University of Saskatchewan.

Stuart Read comes to the CLS for a six month term as a Science Associate with the Mid-IR team. He most recently was working at the University of Guelph as a Research Assistant. Stuart received his PhD in Chemistry from the University of Guelph.

Elen Li joins the engineering team as a Mechanical Engineer. She recently worked for WSP Canada Inc. as an Industrial Mechanical Engineer, here in Saskatoon.  Elen received her Mechanical Engineering degree from the East China University of Science and Technology in Shanghai.

The following job postings are currently available at CLS:

  • Job No. 849 – Outreach Student (Casual)
  • Job No. 848 – Systems Technology Network Analyst
  • Job No. 847 – Systems Technology Software Analyst (Web Services)
  • Job No. 846 – Systems Technology DevOps Analyst
  • Job No. 845 – Systems Technology Software Analyst
  • Job No. 841 - Mid IR (CIHR-THRUST) Postdoctoral Fellow Research Associate – One Year Term
  • Job No. 835 - Research Associate – Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy Beamline

The following Summer Student Opportunities are currently available at CLS:

  • Job No. 843 - Industrial Science Research Assistant

Please visit our careers page for more information.

 


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